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Watts Radiant | Floor Heating & Snow Melting

Fequently Asked Questions

Where do most people install electric floor heating?

Bathrooms are the most common place, followed by kitchens and entryways. Mudrooms are also a great place for a warm floor.

Does an electric floor mat weaken or strengthen my floor?

Watts Radiant mats have been tested by the Tile Council of North America (TCNA) to ASTM C 627, officially known as "A Standard Test Method for Evaluating Ceramic Floor Tile Installation Systems Using the Robinson-Type Floor Tester." It tests for deflection under increasing weight loads on a wooden framed floor or with a concrete slab floor. Our mats passed these tests for HEAVY classifications, such as shopping malls and commercial areas. Mats apparently add tensile strength to the tile and mortar sandwich. When in doubt, follow TCNA and ANSI (American National Standards Institute) specifications.

Is electric floor warming efficient?

Radiant floors warm people and objects directly without overheating the air. Electric radiant converts nearly all its energy into a usable form. You can set the home thermostat lower and still be comfortable. Use a programmable thermostat and the system automatically sets to a lower temperature when the rooms are not in use. Insulate below the floor or below the heating system and on top of the concrete slab to allow the system to respond faster and use less energy.

My bathroom is heated; do I need floor warming?

Even when bathrooms are heated with forced air or baseboard, tile floors can feel cold. Imagine starting the day by stepping out of the shower onto a warm, comfortable tile floor!

Is there any advantage to a "low voltage" electric radiant heating system?

No. Watts Radiant and competitors deliver about the same amount of energy to the floor. They may use less voltage, but require higher amperage to be able to generate the same wattage (heat delivery). Watts Radiant, however, uses line voltage, and lower amperage to deliver the necessary wattage. This allows a larger system to be installed with a smaller breaker. Low-voltage systems use transformers that are noisy, hot and hard to hide, both visually and acoustically. All North American bathrooms have access to 120 Volt (VAC) power and by code, must install electric floor heating systems with GFCI protection. A GFCI detects ground faults and will disconnect the energy to the heating system within milliseconds if necessary.

What voltage do I need for my electric floor heating?

Watts Radiant electric heating systems are built for 120 VAC or 240 VAC (for warming larger areas).

Does 120 VAC work better than 240 VAC?

Both systems have the same efficiency. The best option is to see what power is available for your installation. 240 VAC is more common outside the United States and in commercial applications. A Watts Radiant thermostat can control up to 150 square feet of heated floor on 120 VAC or 300 square feet on 240 VAC.

What makes your heating elements special?

Heating elements must resist job-site abuse and long-term aging. Watts Radiant uses an expensive wire insulation called ETFE (ethylene tetrafluoroethylene). The physical properties of this polymer are unmatched for the application, notably its water resistance, dielectric properties and long-term temperature aging. We also use oxygen-free alloys in our heating elements to give them greater longevity. The dual heating elements are protected with a copper ground shield and jacketed cables are coated with either a highly visible water resistant PEX polymer jacket or a very resilient TPU jacket that provide outstanding properties that avoid damage from minor job-site abuses. No one builds a better heating element wire.

Please note: This FAQ document is designed to answer common questions. Refer to the product's installation manual or appropriate instructions and warnings regarding installation, use and maintenance.

Please note: This FAQ document is designed to answer common questions. Refer to the product's installation manual or appropriate instructions and warnings regarding installation, use and maintenance.

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